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Exhibit Celebrating the Moon Landing, the Space Program, and the Moon’s Appeal Comes to the National Quilt Museum

Man on the Moon celebrates the 50th anniversary of the first moonwalk and all things lunar.

/EIN News/ -- National Quilt Museum - Paducah, KY, June 22, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- PADUCAH, Ky. June 21, 2018 — Man’s first steps on the moon in July of 1969 marked a giant leap forward in our scientific understanding of the heavens, but even Apollo XI’s mission couldn’t shake the grasp of space on our collective imagination.

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Quilt entitled "Ed White" by artist Margaret Williams. Ed White was the first man to walk in space.


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Picture of Fly Me to the Moon exhibit in The National Quilt Museum gallery.


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The 44 quilts in “Fly Me to the Moon,” now on exhibit at the National Quilt Museum, highlight humanity’s ongoing fascination with all things lunar while honoring Apollo astronauts and missions. 

 

“Take a trip to the moon and beyond without the time and rigors of space training! Take a walk down memory lane or learn the story of the missions for the first time,” says exhibit curator Susanne Jones.

 

Both renowned fiber artists and relative newcomers from eight countries are represented in the exhibit, each of which offers a unique and skilled interpretation of the lunar theme.

 

“I wanted high quality work with great visual impact,” Jones said. “It's hard to predict which ones will wow the viewers…They are all fabulous.”

 

Some pieces recall July 20, 1969, when Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Others commemorate astronauts, examine the moon from a scientific angle, or reference its significance in popular culture, folklore and other art forms, including music.

  

Still other quilts, such as the one Jones created, share a glimpse of the artists’ personal relationship with space. Jones’ “Moon Mullins: Living the High Life” portrays her uncle, Dr. H.C. “Moon” Mullins, as turning the lunar lander into a still and dreaming of the moonshine he will soon enjoy.

 

“This exhibit is a rare intersection of history and art,” explains Museum CEO, Frank Bennett, “Everyone remembers where they were when man walked on the moon.  We are getting so many visitors coming to relive that special day.  At the same time, we are seeing many people bringing kids so they can teach a younger generation the history.” 

 

The collection will be on exhibit through September 4 at the National Quilt Museum.  For more information, go to www.quiltmuseum.org/MOON.

 

About The National Quilt Museum

 

Now it its 27th year, the National Quilt Museum brings the work of today’s quilter to audiences around the world through in-facility exhibits, travelling exhibits, and education programs.  It is a top destination for art enthusiasts, hosting visitors from all 50 U.S. states and more than 40 foreign countries every year. Its rotating in-facility exhibits feature quilts from its own collection of more than 600 artifacts, as well as outstanding national and international touring collections. More than 120,000 people experience the museum’s in-facility and traveling exhibits every year.  

 

The museum is also committed to educational outreach, and its programs annually attract more than 4,000 youth and adults. Educational opportunities include the School Block Challenge, Quilt Camp, and the museum’s acclaimed hands-on program, The Creative Stitch, in which people of all ages with no previous experience learn to make a quilt block.   

 

The National Quilt Museum has won the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence for five consecutive years (2014 – 2018). The museum made Southern Living’s “Top 25 Museums in the South” list in 2017, and it has been mentioned in Midwest Living, CNN Travel, National Geographic, USA Today, the Chicago Tribune and many others.

 

The museum occupies 27,000 square feet in historic downtown Paducah, Kentucky. Paducah sits less than 200 miles from several major cities, including Louisville, Nashville, St. Louis and Memphis.  The physical address is 215 Jefferson Street, Paducah, KY, 42001.

 

For a full schedule of upcoming exhibits, visit www.quiltmuseum.org/2018.

 

For the media page, visit www.quiltmuseum.org/media. Follow the museum through Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and the Museum App for both Apple and Android devices.

 

 

 

Attachments

Frank Bennett
                    National Quilt Museum
                    270-442-8856
                    fbennett@quiltmuseum.org
                    

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